Friday, 25 November 2016

You know what time it is!

The First Sunday in Advent - Year A                                                              

Romans 13:11-14                         
Matthew 24:36-44
               
You know what time it is….

A statement.  There is no question mark:  You have enough information to know that the school bus is coming or that you risk being late for work if the traffic is heavy.  No doubt it’s tax time somewhere in the world.  The mailing limit for Christmas presents is almost here.  Don’t you owe the world a better degree of attention?  
What do folk say in response?  Answers are at the ready:  How time flieswhere have the years gonegoodness is it that time already?  Time, it seems, is something which catches up with us like a predator. We present ourselves as victims of time.
A quick survey of the readings during the four Sundays in Advent reveals that there are lots of people not paying attention to the movements in the world and the movements of the Kingdom of God which are happening around them.  A voice cries in the wilderness—a young woman conceives a child in a provincial backwater—a stump produces a shoot—the thief arrives in the dead of night.  We’re not alone.  Plenty of people are not paying attention. 
Which makes you special, then. This Sunday you are going to be privy to what Jesus said to his disciples :
Keep awake, therefore...
or there amongst the Christians of Rome to whom Paul wrote:
You know what time it is, how it is now the  moment for you to wake from sleep.
You have choices to make and a life to be greeted with open eyes and clear vision.  There is darkness to put off from us, to cast out from within us and to resist around us. There is never enough time for those who will not redeem the time they have been given by being wakeful. God is at work in the world and you are invited to join him.  The time is now—in this mortal life.  Now—in the year which begins this Sunday.  Here—in the place where we live and amongst these people beside us.




Thursday, 10 November 2016

Pentecost 26
Proper 28 - Year 
Luke 21:5-19

“By your endurance … gain your souls."

Image result for horsemen of the apocalypseSo - how was your experience of the American election, then?  Good?  Bad? 

The beginning of a new dawn?
The end of the world as you know it? 

If it was the latter, for example, do remember that people emerge from all sorts of things – World Wars, state imposed famines in Russia or China, the Holocaust and the Armenian or the Rwandan Genocide, the fall of the Roman Empire, the Thirty Years War or the War of the Roses.  In the midst of the events it will appear to those on the losing end as if the real world or perhaps just the ‘known world’ were ending.  If you tacked up a sign or scrawled some graffiti on a wall which captured the beleaguered community’s self-diagnosis or the spirit of that moment it might well read:

“No Exit”. 

There’s something quite cold, then, about the archaeologist or historian who treats this or that ten-year or even fifty-year period - as if it were just  another chapter in the human story.  You want to scream at them as they dig around toppled Corinthian columns or through the layers of bones of an ancient gravesite: “Have you no empathy?  Don’t you understand that the world ended here?”

“But it didn’t”, she says to you over the top of her horn-rimmed specs, and points with her yardstick at the layers of civilization to be found above the burnt brick and the rubble.  “Here – here and here”, she says, shrugs her shoulders and then looks at you as if you were some sort of pillock.

In the small “apocalyptic” section of Luke’s Gospel, which we are reading this Sunday, Jesus uses three imperative verbs for his followers who will live in “interesting times” – outlining the things they are to do or not do:

Verse 8: “Watch”.  From the fact that Jesus needs to say this to folks who are obviously already looking around and observing, we must conclude that the word contains some sense that discernment is more than just observation.  Open your eyes and cultivate an eagerness to see something beyond the mere facts of victory, loss and change.

Verse 14: “Decide now that you will not make up your mind ahead of time about what to say” in your defence or in the defence of your  party or your ideals.

Verse 19: “In your endurance (or patience) acquire/possess/gain your soul”.  Most English translations of the New Testament cast this as a future verb (“In your endurance you will gain your soul”) but the verb is an imperative in the original Greek text. An imperative is an instruction. There is very little which is automatic about the process. You must choose to follow it.   Waiting can just be waiting - a fruitless exercise.  But you, the faithful follower of Jesus, have taken the first two imperatives seriously, which  makes such patience a fruitful exercise. 

Discerning rather than merely watching (v.8), and refusing to cloud that discernment by anticipating every evil outcome ahead of time (v.14),  you open the door to the full possession of your own self, in its novelty and openness to God and to the world (v.19).  What could be better?  What could be more necessary right now?